Blanes: The gateway to the Costa Brava

Blanes was originally an old fishing town located approximately one hour north of Barcelona. The modern-day beach town is also just 50 minutes from Girona making it easily accessible from both of the region’s major airports. If you rent a villa on the Costa Brava it’s the ideal place to explore with all of the family. With over 4 kilometres of sandy beaches, characterful coves, and a town centre steeped in history, it is worth adding a day here to your travel itinerary.

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The Beach

The main attraction in Blanes for families is the beach. A pretty promenade flanks the entire coastline which is dotted with shops, bars, and restaurants. On Cala de San Francesc and Playa de Sabanell you can sign up for boats trips, hire sun loungers, and indulge in a multitude of water sports such as windsurfing, paragliding, sailing, and jet-skiing. Playa de Capellans is perfect for diving as the area of Santa Ana Point is particularly abundant with marine life.

 

The Gardens

Blanes is blessed with two wonderful botanical gardens with more than 11,000 species of plants such as aloes, cacti, and yucca palm plants. These gardens, popular with visitors to the town, exide natural beauty, shade, and seclusion which contrasts with the hustle and bustle of Blanes.

 

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The Culture

In addition to the archaeological ruins in the town centre and the myriad of shops, restaurants, and local bars, Blanes also hosts many markets and festivals throughout the year. Climb the hillside to the Castle of San Juan to visit the chapel and fortress, and enjoy views over the town, golden beaches, and azure Mediterranean Sea. If you do climb the steep walk to the top, remember to bring plenty of sunscreen as there aren’t many shaded areas – and don’t forget your camera!

If you are staying close to Blanes or a short drive or train ride away, take a day trip from your Costa Brava vacation rental to the charming coastal city of Blanes.


Catalan custom: Mushroom hunting

The summer season has passed in Catalonia which means mushrooms have begun to sprout all over the Spanish hills. These edible fungi help usher in the ages-old Catalan custom of mushroom hunting.

Throughout Catalonia during this time of year, bolitaires (or mushroom hunters) take to the fertile fields to hunt for and collect mushrooms after the summer harvest. Catalans have passed down the tradition through generations as groups head out–baskets in tow–for early morning weekend rummaging.

A few varieties are known to grow in the region (including ceps and trompetas) and serve as complementary ingredients to a number of dishes like omelettes, soups, and salads.

 

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New to gathering these treasured trumpets? The government of Catalonia has issued information regarding how to properly gather mushrooms; how and whether you need to obtain a mushroom-gathering permit; and further information about mushrooms themselves, including which are safe to eat, which may be poisonous, and helpful nutrition facts.

If you plan to visit Catalonia in the fall, grab a basket and enjoy this community-building tradition among the lush forests of northeastern Spain. If you can’t make it to the countryside, heaps of Barcelona’s markets (like La Bouqueria) sell varieties of the plant so you’ll have no shortage of the nutrient-rich Catalonian wonder. Happy hunting!

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